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11 Ways To Release Anger (The Only Health-Damaging Emotion)

By Timothy J. Legg December 27th, 2019 | Image Source : Men's Journal

Waiting in long lines, dealing with snide remarks from co-workers, driving through endless traffic — it can all become a bit much. While feeling angry by these daily annoyances is a normal response to stress, spending all your time being upset can become destructive.

It’s no secret that letting anger simmer or having rage outbursts hurts your personal and professional relationships. But it also impacts your well-being. Constantly bottling up our frustration can lead to physical and emotional reactions, including like high blood pressure and anxiety.

The good news is that you can learn to manage and channel your anger constructively. One 2010 studyTrusted Source found that being able to express your anger in a healthy way can even make you less likely to develop heart disease.

Take deep breaths

In the heat of the moment, it’s easy to overlook your breathing. But that kind of shallow breathing you do when you’re angry keeps you in fight-or-flight mode.

To combat this, try taking slow, controlled breaths you inhale from your belly rather than your chest. This allows your body to instantly calm itself.

You can also keep this breathing exercise in your back pocket:

  • Find a chair or place where you can comfortably sit, allowing your neck and shoulders to fully relax.
  • Breathe deeply through your nose, and pay attention to your tummy rising.
  • Exhale through your mouth.
  • Try doing this exercise 3 times a day for 5 to 10 minutes or as needed.

Recite a comforting mantra

Repeating a calming phrase can make it easier to express difficult emotions, including anger and frustration.

Try slowly repeating, “Take it easy,” or “Everything’s going to be okay,” the next time you’re feeling overwhelmed by a situation. You can do this out loud if you want, but you can also say it under your breath or in your head.

You can also keep a list of phrases on your phone for a quick reminder before a stressful work presentation or challenging meeting.

Try visualization

Finding your happy place in the midst of a flight delay or work setback can help you feel more relaxed in the moment.

When wrestling with boiling tension, try painting a mental picture to calm your body and brain:

Think of a real or imaginary place that makes you feel happy, peaceful, and safe. This can be that camping trip to the mountains you took last year or an exotic beach you’d like to visit someday.

Focus on the sensory details by envisioning yourself there. What are the smells, sights, and sounds?

Be aware of your breathing and keep this image in your mind until you feel your anxiety start to lift.

Mindfully move your body

Sometimes, sitting still can make you feel even more anxious or on edge. Mindfully moving your body with yoga and other calming exercises can release tension in your muscles.

The next time you’re confronted by a stressful situation, try taking a walk or even doing some light dancing to keep your mind off the stress.

Check your perspective

Moments of high stress can warp your perception of reality, making you feel like the world is out to get you. The next time you feel anger bubbling up, try to check your perspective.

Everyone has bad days from time to time, and tomorrow will be a fresh start.

Express your frustration

Angry outbursts won’t do you any favors, but that doesn’t mean you can’t vent your frustrations to a trusted friend or family member after a particularly bad day. Plus, allowing yourself space to express some of your anger prevents it from bubbling up inside.

Defuse anger with humor

Finding the humor in a heated moment can help you keep a balanced perspective. This doesn’t mean you should simply laugh off your problems, but looking at them in a more lighthearted way can help.

The next time you feel your rage bubbling up, imagine how this scenario might look to an outsider? How might this be funny to them?

By not taking yourself too seriously, you’ll have more chances to see how unimportant minor annoyances are in the big scheme of things.

Change your surroundings

Give yourself a break by taking some personal time from your immediate surroundings.

If your home is cluttered and stressing you out, for example, take a drive or a long walk. You’ll likely find that you’re better equipped to sort through the mess when you return.

Recognize triggers and find alternatives

If your daily commute turns you into ball of rage and frustration, try finding an alternative route or leaving earlier for work. Got a loud co-worker who constantly taps their foot? Look into some noise-cancelling headphones.

The idea is to pinpoint and understand the things that trigger your anger. Once you’re more aware of what they are, you can take steps to avoid falling prey to them.

If you aren’t sure where your anger is coming from, try to remind yourself to take a moment the next time you feel angry. Use this time to take stock of what happened in the moments leading up to your feelings of anger. Were you with a particular person? What were you doing? How were you feelings leading up to that moment?

Focus on what you appreciate

While dwelling on your day’s misfortunes can seem like the natural thing to do, it won’t help you in the short or long term.

Instead, try refocusing on the things that went well. If you can’t find the silver lining in the day, you can also try thinking how things might’ve gone even worse.

Seek help

It’s totally normal and healthy to feel upset an angry from time to time. But if you can’t shake a bad mood or constantly feel overwhelmed by anger, it might be time to ask for help.

If your anger is impacting your relationships and well-being, talking with a qualified therapist can help you work through the sources of your anger and help you develop better coping tools.

Author: Timothy J. Legg

Source: Men’s Journal: 11 Ways to Release Anger

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