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Marky Mark Reveals Weight Loss Trick All Actors Secretly use

Mark Wahlberg’s gym sessions are always a topic of curiosity for his fans. From his ridiculous and much-talked about 2:30 a.m. wakeup—which a routine he has said he changed during the pandemic to allow him to take advantage of his time with his family—to his training with his actor friends, he seems to be among the most disciplined celebs out there.

But recently, Wahlberg gained a significant amount of fat for his movie Father Stu, in which the actor plays a former boxer who is now a priest and goes from fit into fat. He reportedly added 30 pounds for the part over a time frame of around three weeks—which he says he got by consuming 11,000 calories a day during his peak in the month of May.

“Unfortunately, I had to eat, for around two weeks, 7,000 calories, and then the next two weeks, 11,000 calories. It was all fun for around an hour,” he said to Jimmy Fallon during an interview on the Tonight Show. “It’s such a difficult thing to do. Losing weight, you sort of just tough it out—you just do not eat as much, and exercise more. But with this, even when you are full, I would eat another meal after another. I was eating once every three hours. It wasn’t fun.”

Fans might be somewhat worried that the typically beefy actor might have a hard time rebounding from the huge weight gain. But now, only a few months after this, Wahlberg is back to his usually six-pack self, as he showed in a quick clip published to Instagram revealing his ab workout.

Wahlberg removed his shirt to show off his hanging leg raises, working to bring both his legs into a standard position and then move his legs left and right, to workout his obliques. This move can be very effective, and it is a punishing way to workout your core muscles—so as long as you maintain your shoulders, squeeze and activate your core, and push your legs forward using a hanging hollow position throughout your entire round.

Author: Scott Dowdy

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